Festival of Economics 2019

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Location:

Bristol,


Ages:

18 and over


Type:


The eighth Festival of Economics has been programmed by Diane Coyle (University of Cambridge and Enlightenment Economics); the festival will see economists and experts from around the world debate with each other – and their audiences – some of the key economic questions of our time.

We’re supporting the Festival of Economics in our hometown of Bristol for the third year running. The festival facilitates a lively and important discussion about our economic future and some of the big trends, such employee ownership or how we pay for social care. It’s great to see people of all ages and backgrounds attending. Our belief is that the financial system and our economies are inherently linked to the natural environment and the health of our society. Their stability and success is dependent upon them. It is therefore time we promote more alternative thinking as we can no longer measure success purely in terms of growth when our resources are finite – and we can work harder to create a global economy that works better for people and planet.

We should not focus on growth for growth’s sake and the single measure of GDP, an outdated metric incapable of connecting our economy with social and environmental outcomes that determine our wellbeing and future prosperity. It is time to redirect our banks and the flow of money in the economy, and we need greater transparency on how our money is used, to understand its impact and to know where to direct it to create the conditions for people to thrive.

Bevis Watts, CEO, Triodos Bank UK

You can download the Festival of Economics brochure here.

Booking opens Monday 2 September 2019.

Festival of Economics season tickets, for all Festival of Economics events, are available at £77 / £59. This can be purchased online or in person. Please note there are a limited number of season tickets: book early to avoid disappointment. The season ticket does not include free events. Please book those separately.

Image credit: Alys Jones.




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